MEDICAL HYPOTHESES AND RESEARCH
VOL. 6, No. 1/2, July 2010


H. Tayebi-Khosroshahi, et al. [2010] Med. Hypotheses Res. 6: 37-42.


Long-Term Substitute of Intestinal Microflora with
Health Bacteria May Play a Role in Preventing Certain
Diabetic Complications


Hamid Tayebi-Khosroshahi*, Kamyar Kalantar-Zadeh and
Ali Tabrizi

Department of Internal Medicine, Imam Reza Hospital, Tabriz University of Medical
Sciences, Tabriz, Iran (H.T.-K.); Harold Simmons Center for Kidney Disease Research and
Epidemiology, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-University of California
at Los Angeles Medical Center, Torrance, California, USA (K.K.-Z.); Tabriz University
[Medical Sciences), Tabriz, Iran (A.T.)


Abstract. Diabetes nowadays is the most common cause of progressive kidney failure,
leading to dialysis or transplantation. Intestinal microflora play an important role in health
and disease, but this effect remains incompletely characterized. Cytokines and acute phase
reactants such as C-reactive proteins, interleukins, tumor necrosis factor α and
lipopolysaccharides, may have a major role in diabetes, because inflammatory cytokines
induce peripheral insulin resistance by impairing the insulin receptor-dependent signaling. A
key action of gut microflora is the induction of inflammatory factors and cytokines
production. The gut may also be capable of producing cytokines in response to an
inflammatory stimulus, even in the absence of portal or systemic spread of bacteria. We
hypothesize that gut microflora may increase the risk of diabetic nephropathy through
production of inflammatory factors and cytokines. In addition, long-term regulation of gut
microflora by prebiotics and/or probiotics may have preventive effects on certain diabetic
complications such as nephropathy.

Correspondence: Dr. Hamid Tayebi-Khosroshahi, Department of Internal Medicine, Imam
Reza Hospital, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran. Tel: +98 411 3347054.
E-Mail:
drtayebikh@yahoo.com  


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